Self-Assessment Episode 3: Squat Mobility Vs. Stability

In the first post we looked at ankle mobility. We demonstrated the half kneeling ankle dorsiflexion assessment to see if poor ankle mobility was a contributing factor making it difficult to deep squat with proper form. We then moved up the kinetic chain with the supine knee to chest assessment and the seated tibial internal rotation test to see if the hips or knees were making it difficult to deep squat with proper form. If you passed those tests with flying colors, but your deep squat remains less than perfect; you could fall into the group of athletes that have great mobility but lack the ability to control/stabilize movement through these ranges. By definition mobility is the ability of a joint to be moved through its range of motion. Stability refers to the body’s ability to control movement through the available range of motion.

Goblet Squat & Stability

Today we will assess an air squat versus the goblet squat. This serves as a quick assessment to see if the athlete/client is able to achieve full depth while squatting. Clients often times demonstrate the ability to sink into a full squat, but will reveal some type of movement fault. One of the most common faults we see is the loss of lumbo-pelvic position, the dreaded “butt wink”. This position is not optimal for loading. Now we assess the goblet squat using a 20 lb. kettle bell. The kettle bell acts as a counterbalance and allows the athlete to keep their hips underneath them. If the athlete is able to maintain proper positioning throughout the entire movement you can conclude the athlete has the mobility to squat, they many need to work on patterning and stability of the abs, pelvic floor, and diaphragm to create the counterbalance.

The goblet squat is used as a teaching tool for the athlete to work on proper position during the deep squat. As patterning and stabilization increases the athlete should reduce the weight of the kettle bell, reducing the external counterbalance. Goblet squats are a great warm-up exercise for squat day. I will demonstrate some stability drills in quadruped and half kneeling in the following videos to help with and create the counterbalance needed not to lose proper spinal positioning while squatting.

Quadruped Reach

• Start on all fours
• Rock back until your hips are lower than your knees to mimic the bottom of the squat
• Maintain a neutral trunk position
• Reach one arm straight ahead slowly while trying not lose balance or rotate trunk
• Alternate arms or complete a same side series
• 10 repetitions

Half Knee Chop

• Attach tubing at a high point of attachment
• Kneel with outside knee down
• Both knees should be flexed to 90 degrees
• Narrow your base to within 6-inch width of knee of one leg and heel of the other
• While maintaining a tall/upright position, pull tubing down and across the chest while keeping it close to your body
• Shoulders should turn minimally and your head should face forward
• All action should be done with the arms
• Tubing should come across the body from shoulder to hip, keeping your hands close to your chest throughout the movement
• 5-7 controlled repetitions on each side
• If to challenging, can also perform in tall kneeling position (both knees on the ground)

Half Kneel Lift

• Attach tubing at low point of attachment
• Kneel inside knee down
• Both knees should be flexed at 90 degrees
• Narrow your base to within 6-inch width of knee of one leg and heel of the other
• While remaining tall and upright, pull tubing up and across the chest while keeping it close to your body
• Shoulders turn minimally and your head should face forward
• All actions done with the arms
• Tubing should come across the body from hip to opposite shoulder
• Keep your hands close to your chest throughout this movement

Goblet Squat

• Hold kettle bell with two hands in front
• Keep kettle bell close to your chest
• Base of support feet are shoulder width apart, feet slightly turned out
• 3 points of contact big toe/little toe/heel
• Squat straight down keeping kettle bell close
• Spine is in neutral from neck through upper back and lower back
• Trunk will be positioned slightly forward to mimic the bottom position of a loaded barbell squat
• Knees track over 2nd and 5th toes
• A variation to promote an upright torso would be to stand 6-8 inches in front of a wall and perform goblet squats
• 3 sets of 5 slow repetitions
• Can also be performed in-between warm-up sets on squat day before hitting your work sets

Resources:
SFMA (Selective Functional Movement Assessment).
Voight ML, Hoogenboom BJ, Cook G. The Chop and Lift Reconsidered: Integrating Neuromuscular Principles into Orthopedic and Sports Rehabilitation. North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy : NAJSPT. 2008;3(3):151-159.

CrossFit Lifting, CrossFit Weightlifting, Deep Squat, Deep Squat Back, Deep Squat Back Stability, Deep Squat CrossFit, Deep Squat Injury, Deep Squat Stability, Lifting Squat, Squat Butt Wink, Squat Exercises, Squat Flexibility, Squat Flexibility Exercises, Squat Mobility, Squat Stability, Squat Stability Drills, Weightlifting Squat

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